Nikita

2007

CURRICULUM VITAE

Nikita Simmons
PO Box 358, Woodburn, OR 97071 USA
Telephone: (503) 981-0852
E-mail: starina77-at-yahoo-dot-com
Web site: www.synaxis.info

Nikita Simmons (born Nov. 22,1961) studied theology at Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Theological Seminary (Jordanville, NY) and music at the University of Southern Maine (Portland & Gorham, ME). For over twenty years he has researched late medieval Russian singing (c.1540-1660) of the Moscow and other regional singing schools, and has participated in a number of Church Music conferences in the USA and Finland (University of Joensuu, 2007). He has also taught Znamenny Chant notation, repertoire and techniques (as well as Church Slavonic language) in the Old Rite communities of the Russian Orthodox Church of the Nativity at Erie, Pennsylvania and the Russian Orthodox Church of the Ascension at Woodburn, Oregon. He has worked for over 15 years in the book and newspaper publishing industry.

Works in progress include:

A Sourcebook for Studies in Early Russian Church Music (Vol. 1: Foundational and Historical Materials; Vol. 2: Instructional Materials; Vol. 3: Practice Materials);

coordinating a group research project to help revive Podobny/Prosomoia singing in all Orthodox singing traditions (see the Yahoo Podoben Group), and to promote private research by Orthodox musicologoists and liturgists;

assisting in a translation of the Sabbaitic Typicon with commentaries and interpretations;

scanning early neumatic and square-note chant books and various pre-Nikonian liturgical books for online distribution;

designing Church Slavonic fonts for reproducing early period styles of Slavonic typography and literature;

and an important recording project to document the singing of the three distinct groups of Russian Old Believers who settled in Oregon in 1961, including liturgical singing, spiritual verses and folk songs. Three CDs have been produced (as of Winter, 2007), and many more are planned.

The results of some of his research, including transcriptions and analysis of material from pre-Nikonian sources of Znamenny chant, are gradually being made available online at: www.synaxis.info/psalom.